4 Tips to Help You Buy Cheap Motorcycle Insurance

4 Tips to Help You Buy Cheap Motorcycle Insurance

Insurance

The advent of digital technology has led to many changes in how we do things and interact with each other. The same is true of how we interact with the people and companies in our lives. Today, we can get discounts and perks not available before through discounts, trials, and contests.

But in buying insurance, there are still hold-outs who prefer to shop around and avoid the annual renewal list.

Motorcycle insurance is not any different. We often find ourselves yearning for motorcycle insurance discounts, but to do that, we must make sure we’re getting the best deal available. And that involves learning more about insurance policies and coverage, in addition to the mechanics of buying motorcycle insurance.

Here are some helpful tips on how to buy cheap motorcycle insurance.

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One of the main points of confusion in motorcycle insurance purchases is how much to spend and how much to spend on it. And no, it does not matter if you’re a first-time rider or an experienced motorcyclist. But there’s a definite difference in how much to spend on insurance, as well as how much you need to spend.

Consider this: it’s only a handful of months from the time you’re interested in motorcycle insurance to the time you want to buy motorcycle insurance.

And then there’s a time period before the insurance runs out.

That leaves a small window of time to get a good deal.

You also have to consider the other factors that might make you decide to shop around for motorcycle insurance: if you’re renting a motorcycle, or in a rental agreement, or if your vehicle is registered with an insurance company.

And you may want to do a little digging to see if you can save a bit of money by shopping around for motorcycle insurance.

Read Between the Lines

Motorcycle insurance policies come with features and benefits, but you can’t understand all of them by reading the fine print.

You have to read the insurance policy for every policy claim and underwriting event. You also have to understand the language that the insurance company uses.

Examples

For example, for standard motorcycle insurance, you’ll be paying the following premiums:

  • Level 1 premiums (commonly called liability insurance): $15/year
  • Level 2 premiums: $15/year (when the driver is traveling at a maximum speed of 75 mph or higher)
  • At level 3 premiums: $20/year (when the driver is traveling at a maximum speed of 80 mph or higher).

Premiums can differ, depending on the type of insurance coverage that’s purchased. The insurance companies and their other partners may require additional premiums (such as Wreck Injury Cost) that are for the extra coverage.

To make your motorcycle insurance process easier, you can look for a level 3 rider or team, since they have a higher minimum premium requirement.

These extra premiums are meant to make sure the insurance company is compensated for any possible damage that occurs to your vehicle while you’re on the road.

In contrast, it’s important to remember that motorcycle insurance doesn’t protect you from the value of your motorcycle. You also need to know that the $15 level 1 liability insurance does not cover the value of your bike.

Level 1 liability insurance only covers damages that can be classified as uninsured road traffic accidents or RTA.

RTA’s are things like theft, vandalism, or vandalism to your bike that results in the loss of your bike.

Level 2 liability insurance covers anything that causes damage to the vehicle. So that includes things like collision, bodily injury, property damage, and bodily injury.

Level 3 liability insurance covers damage to your bike that exceeds $10,000, excluding motor vehicle damage.

Show Your Driver’s License

When you’re searching for motorcycle insurance, you should look for the program that you would benefit the most from. This means that it might be best to buy a rider or team-level insurance when you’re considering buying a motorcycle.

Some people might assume that these insurance policies are for licensed motorcycle riders or riders who are under the age of 25.

But this isn’t the case.

The states require all types of license holders to have motorcycle insurance, except for college student riders who have a DOT exemption.

You can usually find this information on your motorcycle’s documentation, so look for the words “BOT DL” (commercial motor vehicle license) or “MVIL” (motor vehicle license).

If the information says that you’re under the age of 18, make sure you’re also checking with the insurance agent to see if you’re eligible for the age requirement exemption.

Have 3 Vehicles or a Sidecar

In many states, you’ll be able to get liability insurance on a motorcycle without needing to get a special rider’s license.

But motorcycle liability insurance can still be pricey, so it’s still a good idea to have insurance on other vehicles.

For example, if you have your motorcycle, sidecar, and an all-terrain vehicle or ATV, you can save a few hundred dollars a year in insurance costs by simply getting all-terrain rider and ATV rider liability insurance on all of the vehicles.

Insurance on Sidecars

In the state of California, most insurance companies offer liability insurance for sidecar riders for $75.

However, it might be a good idea to check with the motorcycle insurance company to see if they offer any special rider’s insurance coverage.

You may also find that it’s cheaper to have the liability insurance on both the sidecar and the sidecar driver (and not the driver of the ATV) so that they can pay for the insurance on the sidecar.

Insurance on ATVs

ATVs are the dirt bikes of the motorcycle world. They are extremely popular, and they’re the preferred vehicle for many motorcyclists.

This means that most motorcycle insurance companies offer insurance for ATVs.

However, it might be a good idea to check with the motorcycle insurance company to see if they offer any special rider’s insurance coverage.

You might find that it’s cheaper to have the liability insurance on both the sidecar and the sidecar driver (and not the driver of the ATV) so that they can pay for the insurance on the sidecar.

Unfortunately, there is no specific type of rider’s insurance for ATVs, but the coverage is usually pretty similar to that of motorcycle riders.

All-Terrain Rider (ATR) Liability Insurance

All-terrain rider liability insurance might also help you to save money on your liability insurance. Most state laws require that all riders, including the driver of ATVs, must carry motorcycle liability insurance. But some insurance companies offer riders insurance that doesn’t require them to have a motorcycle license. Like the ATR rider coverage, some riders insurance doesn’t require you to have a motorcycle license.

This coverage will usually cover you and the driver of the ATV. When they’re riding on public roads and when they’re off-road.

How much do motorcycle insurance rates cost?

Although motorcycle insurance can be very expensive, it doesn’t have to be. When you understand the ins and outs of motorcycle insurance, you’ll be able to lower your motorcycle insurance rates. Also, check the 7 Things About Car Insurance.

First, you should look into getting the cheapest coverage that you can. In some states, you can get a motorcycle rider insurance policy for as little as $3 or $4 a month, depending on how much insurance coverage you want.

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